JusticeInfo.net is an independent media platform of Fondation Hirondelle, together with academic partners Oxford Transitional Justice Research (OTJR) and Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI). JusticeInfo.net provides news and analysis of justice developments in transition societies, such as the work of Truth Commissions, tribunals investigating serious human rights abuses, peace and reconciliation processes. These are essential, because the way past political violence is dealt with defines the values of the present and the choices a society makes for its future.

 

The JusticeInfo.net team

The managers and editors of JusticeInfo.net are François Sergent (Editor in Chief), Ephrem Rugiririza (Deputy Editor in Chief) and Julia Crawford (Deputy Editor in Chief), Pierre Hazan (Editorial Advisor).

JusticeInfo.net works closely with a wide network of sources throughout the world and with Fondation Hirondelle media in conflict and transition countries:

 

 

Why JusticeInfo.net?

Although there are excellent sources of information on particular geographical zones, there is no media platform offering free, comprehensive coverage of justice, peace and reconciliation issues in English and French. This is why we decided to create JusticeInfo.net, because we believe peace, justice and reconciliation processes go hand in hand with the right to information. We aim to make JusticeInfo.net the go-to media in this field.

 

JusticeInfo.net for whom?

JusticeInfo.net is aimed at everyone interested in justice, peace and reconciliation issues who wants access to reliable sources, where the information is strictly verified. This is especially important in societies emerging from conflict, where information is often limited and biased.

 

Republishing or using our articles

JusticeInfo.net also aims to be a source for media who can re-publish our articles under Creative Commons. The author and the name JusticeInfo.net must appear clearly.

 

Justiceinfo.net Editorial Charter

Justiceinfo.net is an electronic media platform in French and English of Fondation Hirondelle, whose headquarters is in Lausanne. Justiceinfo.net covers transitional justice in the widest sense: judicial procedures and trials, peace and reconciliation processes, Truth and Justice Commissions, remembrance. It uses all forms of web medium: text, images, audio, video, social media. It covers transitional justice from all aspects: legal, historical and political but also cultural, ethical and philosophical. 

Justiceinfo.net is aimed at transitional justice practitioners (judges, lawyers, men and women of the law), specialists, journalists, academics, students and also those in transition countries who are most directly concerned:  victims and associations representing them; NGOs and governments. Justiceinfo.net aims to be the go-to website on transitional justice.  Justiceinfo.net provides news but also debates and opinion pieces representing all points of view and respecting the principles of balanced news and information.

With regard to its founding principles, values and way of working, Justiceinfo.net adheres to the Charter of Fondation Hirondelle (il faut le lien dans les 2 langues). FH creates and supports independent media in crisis zones. It is independent of political and economic powers. It provides and defends non-partisan news and information. Nobody can impose or demand a ban on the broadcast of FH media content, except persons specifically mandated by the Fondation.

Justiceinfo.net adheres to the Guidelines on media established by the UNESCO round-table (4-5 May 2000, Geneva).

 

Editorial principles

Justiceinfo.net aims to provide accurate, independent news and information. Justiceinfo.net aims to help its readers forge their opinions freely. Justiceinfo.net demands of itself professionalism and excellence in its field of activity, including measurable results in relation to clearly defined objectives, a capacity to analyse situations, rigorous management, quality and thus success for our media platform. Professionalism is for us a primary value. Independence from political and economic powers is cardinal. Only this independence can guarantee that our journalism is impartial.

Honesty is essential, we think. Firstly honesty as journalists so we will check facts to the best of our ability, putting aside our own subjectivity, convictions, life experiences and personal points of view. Also honesty as a general principle, in our relations with third parties, hosts, donors and partners. With regard to contracts, commitments and promises, we aim to favour transparency over guile.

Empathy and respect for others encompasses a number of things that we hold dear. They include respect for differences between cultures, for individual differences and for tolerance.

Being open to the world is part of our identity. The staff and correspondents of Justiceinfo.net are of many different nationalities and cultures. 

Justiceinfo.net must represent different opinions and points of view. Justiceinfo.net is a news website but also a place for debate and opinion. As a forum on transitional justice it welcomes debate, opinion pieces, analyses and interviews and promotes debates between opposing views that are balanced and respectful of all sides. The Head of Project and Editor in Chief may write Opinion pieces, provided they are presented clearly as such. As Fondation Hirondelle journalists, members of the editorial team have neither the mandate nor the authority to take part personally in an argument or debate on transitional justice. They may share opinions and advice on the defence of justice and global justice issues with other components of society and concerned players.

In the same vein, Justiceinfo.net may post signed editorials and “columns” or “Op Eds” that can help forge the identity of the website. They must be accompanied by a note stating that “this article does not necessarily reflect the views of

Fondation Hirondelle”.

Justiceinfo.net works in close collaboration with the other programmes of the Fondation. It may reproduce text, audio, photo and video content already produced by the Fondation Hirondelle network or broadcast specific content produced by a Fondation Hirondelle programme, which will be credited.

Fondation Hirondelle’s Code of Ethics (il faut le lien sur le code éthique) is an integral part of the JusticeInfo.net Charter.

 

Editorial Partnerships

Justiceinfo.net has forged partnerships with universities, notably Oxford Transitional Justice Research (OTJR, a high level transitional justice research network of Oxford University) and Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI, a Harvard University centre dedicated to the study of humanitarian crises).  Justiceinfo.net posts OTJR and HHI publications under the joint responsibility of the Editor and managers of OTJR and HHI. Justiceinfo.net encourages partnerships with university research centres.  

Means of broadcast and reproduction of content

Justiceinfo.net is a digital media, broadcast free of charge on the Internet. Justiceinfo.net encourages sharing and reproduction of its content in line with Creative Commons principles, i.e. free reproduction of content, provided it is not changed and the source Justiceinfo.net is credited. 

Funding

Justiceinfo.net is transparent with regard to its funding. All donors and financial support are mentioned publicly on the Justiceinfo.net site and in activity reports.

FS – JM 20-08-15

 

Posting comments

We invite you to participate in JusticeInfo.net. We want it to be interactive – and your contributions count! However transitional justice is a sensitive subject, so please be careful and follow the following basic rules:

1. Identify yourself

Please give your name or pseudonym, the town and country where you are located.

2. Express yourself politely

If you cannot say it politely, then it cannot be published here. Verbal attacks on individuals and abusive comparisons will also not be accepted.

3. Watch your language

Please do not use jargon or slang, which may not be understood. Please be explicit. We also ask that you express yourself only in the languages of JusticeInfo.net, i.e. English and French.

4. Keep to the point

Your comments should concern only articles published on the site.

5. Don’t start a private conversation here

Because it is extremely annoying for other readers. Do it somewhere else, if you have to!

6. Respect other people’s privacy

You may not give anyone’s telephone number or any other information that could identify them without their consent.

7. Respect the law

Illegal activities in any form are prohibited on this site, as elsewhere, including if you use a pseudonym. Illegal activities include: non-authorized copying of software, photos and images; harassment; fraud; illegal trafficking; defamation; any form of discrimination, including ethnic, racial or sexual discrimination. We will also remove any content that is defamatory, injurious to others, obscene, pornographic, racist, xenophobic or revisionist (e.g. denying established facts and legal rulings on genocide and serious crimes). Hate speech or incitement to violence will not be tolerated.

JusticeInfo.net reserves the right to withdraw any comment or contribution that goes against existing laws and decent behaviour. JusticeInfo.net may suspend a user account at any time without formal notice.

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

Comments

Also on Justice Info

Central African Rep.
“No peace for the CAR while armed groups hold...
24.06.17
Ephrem Rugiririza, JusticeInfo.Net

Thierry Vircoulon, a researcher at the French International Relations Institute (IFRI), lectures on security issues in Africa. In an interview with JusticeInfo.Net, he is pessimistic about the chances that a ceasefire for the Central African Republic (CAR) signed in Rome on June 19 will be implemented. He says there is no chance of a lasting peace deal so long as armed groups continue to hold sway on the ground. On June 20, only a few hours after the accord was signed, clashes between militia groups left up to a hundred people dead in Bria, in central CAR. Thierry Vircoulon, researcher at the French International Relations Institute (IFRI) What do you think are the chances that the...

Read more
Cambodia
Top Khmer Rouge leader denies genocide at close...
23.06.17
AFP

One of the top surviving leaders of Cambodia's ruthless Khmer Rouge regime on Friday denied genocide charges and rejected the label of "murderer" in forceful closing remarks at a lengthy UN-backed trial. The Khmer Rouge's former head of state, 85-year-old Khieu Samphan, spoke angrily to the Phnom Penh chamber trying him and another senior leader, 90-year-old Nuon Chea, for the regime's killing of ethnic Vietnamese and Muslim minorities, forced marriage and rape. The men are the two most senior living members of the radical Maoist group that seized control of Cambodia in 1975 and carried out some of the worst atrocities of the 20th century. Up to two million people are believed to...

Read more
United States
USA : Addressing Our Tortured History, One...
23.06.17
David Tolbert

The recent remarks of Mayor Mitch Landrieu ordering the removal of monuments honoring confederate leaders from New Orleans stands out as an important moment of moral clarity and civic courage for our country. The question is, how do we build on the success of the “take ‘em down” movement to tackle the deep, ongoing history of racial violence in the United States. We also need to see many more leaders on the local, state and national levels addressing the past truthfully, apologizing for the multitude of abuses committed against people of color and correcting our twisted historical narrative. Such efforts are particularly important at this moment when revisionism is on the rise in our...

Read more