Oxford Transitional Justice Research (OTJR) is an inter-disciplinary network of more than 200 academics and students working on issues of transition in societies recovering from mass conflict and/or repressive rule. Founded in 2007, it is now one of the largest and most diverse academic communities conducting research in this field.

OTJR hosts a weekly academic seminar, which brings leading researchers and practitioners to Oxford to discuss aspects of their work. OTJR is dedicated to producing high-quality scholarship that connects intimately to practical and policy questions in transitional justice, including research within the following themes: domestic and international prosecutions; truth commissions and other truth-recovery processes; commemoration and memorialisation; local and traditional practices; compensation and reparations; and institutional reform.

The academic op-eds published on JusticeInfo.net under our label have been edited by Oxford Transitional Justice Research.

 

OTJR Academic Reviewers

Cath Collins, Professor of Transitional Justice, Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster

Phil Clark, Reader in Comparative Politics and International Politics at SOAS, Member of OTJR's Advisory Board

Nicola Palmer, Lecturer in Criminal Law at King's College London, Member of OTJR's Advisory Board

Briony Jones, Senior Researcher at Swisspeace, OTJR member

Leila Ullrich, PhD Candidate in Criminology, University of Oxford, OTJR's Convenor

Claire Vergerio, PhD Candidate in International Relations, University of Oxford, OTJR's Chief Editor

Daniel Franchini, MJur Candidate, University of Oxford, OTJR's Deputy Editor

 

http://otjr.crim.ox.ac.uk/


 

 

 

 

The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI) is a university-wide center within the Harvard community that provides expertise in public health, medicine, social science, management, and other disciplines to promote evidence-based approaches to humanitarian assistance.

The mission of the Initiative is to relieve human suffering in war and disaster by advancing the science and practice of humanitarian response worldwide. HHI fosters interdisciplinary collaboration in order to: improve the effectiveness of humanitarian strategies for relief, protection and prevention; instill human rights principles and practices in these strategies; educate and train the next generation of humanitarian leaders.

http://hhi.harvard.edu/

 

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