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    Five questions on the ICC
    21.10.16
    AFP

    Once a champion of the International Criminal Court (ICC), South Africa dealt a blow to the world tribunal Friday by announcing its intention to withdraw, a move that came on the heels of a similar move by Burundi. Here are five key questions following Pretoria's announcement: Is this the end of the ICC? Not according to Harvard law professor Alex Whiting. "International criminal justice has always had its ups and downs and setbacks in the past. This is another setback, but the court is not going to disappear," he told AFP. The ICC's founding Rome Statute "is a treaty and parties are free to leave it as they want," said Aaron Matta, senior researcher at the Hague Institute for Global...

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    People's tribunal accuses Monsanto of 'ecocide'
    14.10.16
    AFP

    Global activists Friday launched a people's tribunal, accusing giant US seeds firm Monsanto of violating human rights and committing the crime of "ecocide", by posing a "major threat" to the environment. Monsanto, which produces genetically-modified seeds as well as controversial pesticides, has already dismissed the gathering in The Hague organised by hundreds of grassroots groups as a "parody" with no legal standing, and refused to attend. But five professional international judges will hear from 30 witnesses, including scientists, farmers and beekeepers, who have travelled from five...

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    Week in Review: Hunger strike in The Hague, and looking back on a fiasco in Rwanda
    19.09.16
    François Sergent, JusticeInfo.net

        It was a rich and varied week in transitional justice, with its high and low points.   In the Hague, the International Criminal Court (ICC) faced new difficulties in trying former Congolese warlord Bosco Ntaganda, who no longer wants to cooperate with the Court. Ntaganda, who has been in the ICC prison in the Netherlands for 36 months, is boycotting his trial. He has also gone on hunger strike to protest restrictions on his family visits, imposed by the judges because of his suspected attempts to intimidate witnesses through intermediaries. Ntaganda is accused of crimes against...

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    ICC prosecutors put new focus on ecological harm, land grabs
    15.09.16
    AFP

    Prosecutors at the International Criminal Court Thursday said they would boost their focus on environmental destruction and illegal land grabs as possible crimes against humanity, in what may prove a warning to big business. In a new ICC internal policy, chief prosecutor Fatou Bensouda said her office would "give particular consideration" to crimes committed by or resulting in "the destruction of the environment, the illegal exploitation of natural resources or the illegal dispossession of land". The landmark move was hailed by environmental and rights activists who said it could act as a...

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    ICC Prosecutor Answers Critics
    13.06.16
    JusticeInfo.net

    ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda granted an interview to JusticeInfo.net. She strongly rejects accusations that the ICC is delivering one-sided justice and is concerned about the consequences for Africa if some States pull out of the ICC. Referring particularly to the Court’s fiasco over Kenya, Bensouda strongly condemns pressure and intimidation of her witnesses and a political climate that makes exercising justice difficult. But she asserts her determination to prosecute sitting Heads of State if necessary. In this interview, the Prosecutor also talks about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Colombia, Côte d’Ivoire, Afghanistan and Georgia, the changes she is making to her penal strategy and...

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    Week In Review: Interview with the ICC Prosecutor, Women and Slaves
    13.06.16
    François Sergent, JusticeInfo.net

    Interviewing Fatou Bensouda about transitional justice is like talking to the late, great pianist Glenn Gould for a musician, or to Lionel Messi about football. But JusticeInfo’s editorial advisor Pierre Hazan met in Geneva with International Criminal Court (ICC) Prosecutor Bensouda, who admitted she has one of the most difficult jobs in the world. She is criticized both for doing too much, notably in Africa, and not doing enough in the rest of the world, especially when it comes to the Western powers.  Bensouda, a former lawyer and minister in The Gambia, had an answer for each of these...

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    The Week in Review: War on the Rules of War
    09.05.16
    François Sergent, JusticeInfo.net

    Even war has rules – a complex set of judicial constraints born from the ideas of Saint Augustin and Saint Thomas on what constitutes a “just war”, and enshrined in the Geneva Conventions, of which the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is custodian.  These “rules of war” or International Humanitarian Law (IHL), whose prime aim is to protect civilians, is widely and frequently violated both by warring States and non-State combatants. Last week, for example, a camp for displaced Syrians was bombed, probably by Syria and its Russian allies, killing some 30 people, all civilians....

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    International Criminal Court Gets a New Home
    21.12.15
    Stéphanie Maupas, correspondent in The Hague

    Six glass towers of different heights, meant to mirror the sand dunes of the North Sea coast, have since December 14 been the new home of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Now that it has taken possession of these purpose-built premises, the Court sees it as an opportunity to project its own permanent status. The ICC now sits in the international district of The Hague, near the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the NCIA (a NATO agency), the Peace Palace and above all only 2 km from the prison in Scheveningen where ICC detainees are kept as they await trial. At...

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    "As a human rights activist, I do feel frustrated sometimes" says ICC prosecutor Fatou Bensouda
    19.11.15
    Jo Biddle, AFP

    Three years into her nine-year tenure the prosecutor of the world's only permanent war crimes court is battling a growing caseload as she fights "to give victims a voice." This year Fatou Bensouda, a trained lawyer from Gambia, opened preliminary probes into alleged crimes in Palestine, broadened the scope of an initial inquiry in Ukraine, and has asked the ICC to open a formal investigation into the 2008 Russia-Georgia war. Now she is joining calls for the International Criminal Court to increase its annual budget to 153.32 million euros ($163 million) to pay for more trained...

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    Acquitted Congolese is an ICC Embarrassment
    12.05.15
    Stéphanie Maupas

    The Hague, May 12, 2015 (FH) – Mathieu Ngudjolo, the first person to be acquitted by the International Criminal Court (ICC), was on Monday forcibly sent back to the Democratic Republic of Congo. The ICC and Dutch authorities dismissed fears that his security would be in danger if he went back. Ngudjolo tried everything to avoid being sent back. But on May 11, handcuffed and escorted by six policemen, he was put on a flight to Kinshasa via Brussels. Belgium rejected his last political asylum request, as did the Netherlands and Kenya. “Mathieu Ngudjolo is viewed as a war criminal,” says his...

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    Testimony of an International Criminal Court Judge
    11.05.15
    Stéphanie Maupas

    Bulgarian judge Ekaterina Trendafilova left The Hague in March after nine years at the International Criminal Court (ICC), during which she presided a court, became an appeals judge and came face to face with most of the ICC accused. She talked to Justice Info about her nine years at the ICC.   How do you perceive the work of an ICC judge? A lot of destinies are dependent on how we do our job. The destiny of those who are brought to justice, the destinies of victims and the destiny of a new institution. Law is really, I wouldn’t say complicated, but it is not easy. It is a sophisticated...

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