Will Guinea hold trial this year for 2009 stadium massacre?

Will Guinea hold trial this year for 2009 stadium massacre?
Aïssatou Barry in Conakry
18.01.18
Aïssatou Barry in Conakry

  In Guinea, investigations into the September 2009 massacre in Conakry have finally closed, seven years after the event. Announcing this on December 29, 2017, Guinean Justice Minister Cheik Sacko said the suspects have been referred for trial. On September 28, 2009 the military junta in power at the time brutally crushed a peaceful opposition...

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COUNTRY FOCUS

Rohingya militants say Myanmar refugee return plan 'deceitful'
AFP 20.01 - Rohingya militants on Saturday hit out at a repatriation plan for refugees from Bangladesh to...
Gambians enjoy freedom post-Jammeh, but criticise economy
AFP 20.01 - A year ago, Gambians wept for joy as Yahya Jammeh went into exile, bringing the...
Amazon's indigenous people 'never so threatened': pope
AFP 19.01 - Pope Francis sounded a stark warning about the future of the Amazon and its peoples during a...
Pro-apartheid S.Africa 'homeland' leader dies
AFP 19.01 - A former leader of a black tribal homeland that was one of the so-called Bantustans...
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This Week

This is not Myanmar’s path to peace
This is not Myanmar’s path to peace
18.01.18
Frontier

Myanmar's government runs the risk of ceding so much control to the Tatmadaw (national army) that it simply becomes irrelevant to the peace process. The next 21st Century Panglong Union Peace Conference is supposed to be just a few weeks away, but you wouldn’t know it from the Tatmadaw’s recent behaviour. Extrajudicial killings, disruption of peace meetings, fresh offensives: if you are trying to get people around a table, it’s a strange way to go about it. In recent weeks, we’ve had the deaths of four Karenni Army soldiers in military custody and the shootout at a Tatmadaw base that left...

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How the ICTY has changed our world
How the ICTY has changed our world
03.01.18
Pierre Hazan, JusticeInfo editorial advisor and professor at Neuchâtel University

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) closed its doors on December 31, 2017, after working for 24 years, issuing 161 indictments and nearly as many judgments, hearing 4,600 witnesses over 10,800 days of trials, producing millions of pages and costing billions of dollars. Apart from the Second World War, no war has been as studied and certainly none has been the subject of judicial procedures like the one that tore the former Yugoslavia apart in the 1990s.   So the time has come for a first evaluation, and the legacy of the ICTY is clearly considerable. Its...

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Key dates in Tunisia since 2011 revolt
10.01.18
AFP

Key developments in Tunisia in the seven years since president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali was toppled in a revolt that sparked a wave of uprisings in the region. - 2011: President flees - Ben Ali quits on January 14, 2011 after weeks of demonstrations sparked by the self-immolation of a fruit seller who was protesting police harassment and unemployment. He is the first leader to stand down in the Arab Spring, fleeing to Saudi Arabia after 23 years in power. In October, Islamist group Ennahda wins 89 of the 217 seats in a new constituent assembly, just months after being legalised in March. It is Tunisia's first free election. The assembly elects former opposition leader Moncef...

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Living through the horrors of genocide: humanitarian workers in Rwanda
Living through the horrors of genocide: humanitarian workers in Rwanda
19.01.18
The Conversation

They are on the frontlines of any major conflict or disaster – but how much is known about the daily experiences of humanitarian workers in these extreme situations? In their new book, Génocide et crimes de masse. L’expérience rwandaise de MSF (“Humanitarian Aid, Genocide and Mass Killings: Médecins sans frontières, the Rwandan experience, 1982-97”), Marc Le Pape and Jean-Hervé Bradol set out to answer some of these questions. The book is also informed by Bradol’s experience of working for Médecins Sans Frontières in Rwanda during the genocide. Here, they discuss their findings. You...

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By Region

Burundi: "Impunity for serious crimes remains the norm"
Burundi: "Impunity for serious crimes remains the norm"
19.01.18
Human Rights Watch

The Burundi government continued its repression of real and perceived political opponents in 2017, according to the annual report of Human Rights Watch published on January 18. This included murder, forced disappearance, torture and arbitrary arrest. In its determination to continue suppressing the population without the outside world's gaze, the regime of Pierre Nkurunziza has also declared all foreign investigators persona non grata.  The political and human rights crisis that began in Burundi in April 2015, when President Pierre Nkurunziza announced that he would run for a disputed third term, continued through 2017, as government forces targeted real and perceived opponents with near total impunity. Security forces and...

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Pope focuses on Chile's migrants before Peru leg
Pope focuses on Chile's migrants before Peru leg
18.01.18
AFP

Pope Francis will close his visit to Chile on Thursday with an open-air mass on the beach, before leaving for Peru on the last leg of his South American trip. The pope's homily at the mass for tens of thousands of pilgrims expected at Lobitos Beach, near the northern city of Iquique, will focus on immigration.  Some 1,800 kilometers (1,120 miles) north of the capital Santiago, the city has been a huge draw for illegal immigrants from Chile's poorer neighbors, helping to drive an economic boom. More than half a million registered foreign nationals currently live in Chile, 3 percent of the country's 17.5 million population, but there are growing concerns about increasing illegal immigration from poor countries such as Haiti and...

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Rohingya militants say Myanmar refugee return plan 'deceitful'
Rohingya militants say Myanmar refugee return plan 'deceitful'
20.01.18
AFP

Rohingya militants on Saturday hit out at a repatriation plan for refugees from Bangladesh to Myanmar set to begin next week, saying it aims to trap the Muslim minority in long-term camps while their ancestral lands are seized. Bangladesh and Myanmar have agreed to send back around 750,000 refugees who arrived since October 2016 over the next two years, a process set to begin as early as Tuesday. But the deal has been pilloried by many Rohingya refugees who say they do not want to return to Rakhine after fleeing atrocities including murder, rape and arson attacks on their homes. Rights groups and the UN say any repatriations must be voluntary with safety assured in a state where communal hatred still runs sky high. Concerns are...

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As Yugoslav tribunal closes, a look back at its history
As Yugoslav tribunal closes, a look back at its history
03.01.18
Pierre Hazan, JusticeInfo editorial advisor and professor at Neuchâtel University

In his last speech to the UN Security Council on December 6, 2017, ICTY President Carmel Agius expressed satisfaction that out of 161 persons indicted, all have been tried or have died, representing a 100% success rate, although the difficulties were many. This is all the more surprising because the first international criminal tribunal had everything against it. It was created in 1993, in the midst of war in Bosnia- Herzegovina, with no access to the former Yugoslavia, and was pushed by founding fathers who did not even want it to succeed!  The ICTY was proposed to the Security Council by French Foreign Minister at the time Roland Dumas (Resolutions 808 and 827) as a tool to deter crimes but above all to fend off accusations that he and...

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