ICTY to hear closing arguments in Mladic case

ICTY to hear closing arguments in Mladic case
Stéphanie Maupas, correspondent in The Hague
04.12.16
Stéphanie Maupas, correspondent in The Hague

The trial of former Bosnian Serb military boss Ratko Mladic is coming to an end before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The Prosecutor’s closing arguments are due to start on Monday December 5, followed by those of the defence. Mladic, who has been on trial for more than four years, is charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes committed between 1992 and 1995 in...

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'Butcher of Bosnia' Mladic led campaign to make Muslims 'vanish'
AFP 05.12 - Former Serb commander Ratko Mladic led a relentless military campaign during the...
S.African opposition in court to block ICC exit
AFP 05.12 - South Africa's main opposition party, the Democratic Alliance, launched a legal bid...
'Butcher of Bosnia' Mladic back in court as trial nears end
AFP 05.12 - Former Serb military commander Ratko Mladic, once dubbed "The Butcher of Bosnia",...
Mladic, 'Butcher of Bosnia', back in court as trial nears end
AFP 05.12 - Former feared Serb military commander Ratko Mladic, once dubbed "The Butcher of...
Uganda rebel Ongwen: victim turned killer
AFP 04.12 - Abducted by gunmen as a 10-year-old boy on his way to school, Dominic Ongwen rose...
US: Trump Should Govern With Respect for Rights
09.11.16

(Washington, DC) – United States President-elect Donald Trump should abandon campaign rhetoric that...

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This Week

Mali: ‘Red Berets’ Trial Marks Progress in Tackling Impunity
Mali: ‘Red Berets’ Trial Marks Progress in Tackling Impunity
30.11.16
Human Rights Watch

(Dakar) – The trial of the leader of the 2012 coup in Mali, Gen. Amadou Haya Sanogo, and 17 co-defendants, including other members of the Malian army, is set to begin on November 30, 2016, in the southern Malian town of Sikasso. The defendants are accused of the 2012 abduction and killing of 21 elite “Red Berets,” who were detained and forcibly disappeared between April 30 and May 1, 2012, after being accused of involvement in an April 30 counter-coup against Sanogo and his loyalists. The following statement is from Corinne Dufka, associate Africa director at Human Rights Watch: “The...

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Could ICC withdrawal of South Africa and others spell more violence in Africa?
Could ICC withdrawal of South Africa and others spell more violence in Africa?
26.10.16
Pierre Hazan, JusticeInfo.net editorial advisor

How things have changed! It was an African country, Senegal, that was the first in the world to ratify on February 2, 1999, the statutes of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Driven by civil society, some 30 other African countries then followed its example in the name of fighting impunity. Many may have forgotten that this wave of ICC membership happened despite a virulent diplomatic campaign by the Bush administration, which threatened to retaliate against any non-NATO State that ratified the ICC statutes. The United States wanted to see the Court die, and yet the majority of African...

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INFOGRAPHY: Transitional justice explained
INFOGRAPHY: Transitional justice explained
07.11.16
Justice Info

Since “transitional justice” is not a term that is well understood by the general public and is at the heart of JusticeInfo.net’s concerns, we thought it was time to explain the overall concept in a simple way, using images. Just below the infography, you can find the, enriched text version. It supplements the information contained in the image, for those who wish to know more. Please feel free to share this infography on your social networks, blogs and elsewhere. It is produced in Creative Commons and thus free of copyright, on condition that the source is quoted and the link is...

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ICC: First Lord’s Resistance Army Trial Begins
ICC: First Lord’s Resistance Army Trial Begins
05.12.16
Human Rights Watch

(Brussels) – The opening of the International Criminal Court trial of a Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander is an important new chapter in holding the rebel group accountable for its brutal crimes in northern Uganda, Human Rights Watch said today. The trial of Dominic Ongwen, who was abducted as a child and later became a senior LRA commander, will begin on December 6, 2016, in The Hague. The charges will be read, followed by opening statements from the prosecution and lawyers who represent several thousand victims involved in the case. The trial will then adjourn until January 16,...

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By Regions

Kigali deems Catholic Church genocide apology “inadequate”
Kigali deems Catholic Church genocide apology “inadequate”
30.11.16
Emmanuel Sehene Ruvugiro, correspondent in Kigali

In a pastoral letter read out on November 20 in most Rwandan churches, the bishops of nine dioceses in the country asked forgiveness for all “people of the Church and Christians” implicated in the Rwandan genocide of 1994. The nine prelates nevertheless stress that the Church “did not send anyone” to commit genocide. The Rwandan government called the statement “profoundly inadequate”, and urged an apology from the Vatican.  “Given the scale of the crimes, there is ample justification for an apology from the Vatican,” says a Rwandan...

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Week in Review: A difficult path to truth and remembrance
Week in Review: A difficult path to truth and remembrance
05.12.16
François Sergent, JusticeInfo

This week showed some of the different faces of transitional justice. In Colombia, a new peace accord was finally ratified, whilst Tunisia continued public hearings of former regime victims, and debate continued in Rwanda over the role of the Catholic Church in the 1994 genocide. After signing the Colombian peace accord, President Juan Manuel Santos and the main rebel movement FARC now have six months to implement it. Justice and impunity are central issues in the process.  “The revised accord details the way transitional justice is to...

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Rebuilding history? Debate rages over lost Afghan Buddhas
Rebuilding history? Debate rages over lost Afghan Buddhas
30.11.16
AFP

For centuries they stood, two monumental ancient statues of Buddha carved into the cliffs of Bamiyan, loved and revered by generations of Afghans -- only to be pulverised by the Taliban in an act of cultural genocide. It felt like the loss of family for many who live and tend their crops nearby -- but some 15 years on they are hopeful these awe-inspiring relics can be reconstructed. But experts are divided on the value of rebuilding the artefacts, with some insisting it is more important to preserve the remains of the entire crumbling...

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‘Death opens the eyes of the living’
‘Death opens the eyes of the living’
30.11.16
Marcela Aguila Rubín

Secret mass graves in Mexico, daily bombings and a mounting death toll in Syria, 30,000 “disappeared” people in Argentina. What does the fight for truth and justice mean in terrible contexts like these where impunity persists? A Swiss research project hopes to provide an answer. “What does ‘right to the truth’ actually mean when criminal proceedings are not possible due to amnesty laws, state denial, systematic disappearances of bodies or the deaths of those responsible?” ponders Sévane Garibian, a law professor at Geneva and...

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On the Web
Five Things to Know about the ICC’s Afghanistan Investigation
29.11.16

With the International Criminal Court (ICC) on the verge of opening an investigation into Afghanistan, much has been written about how this might affect Canada. Could the investigation focus on the...

The Clock is Ticking – Keeping South Africa in the ICC is a Tall, but Not Impossible, Order
25.11.16

The clock is ticking. In just about eleven months, South Africa will officially withdraw from the International Criminal Court (ICC). Here at the Assembly of States Parties (ASP), though, the...

Whatever Happens, the ICC’s Investigation into US Torture in Afghanistan is a Win for the Court
17.11.16

It was predicted when the US Senate released its so-called ‘Torture Report’. A few weeks ago, it was reported to be true. And now the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court...

What the ICC Can Do to Improve its Relationship with African States
01.11.16

Allegations that the International Criminal Court (ICC) is biased against ‘Africa’ are nothing new. They have persisted for nearly a decade now and have only achieved greater salience in the wake...

Ten African States Who Will Stick with the International Criminal Court
28.10.16

In the wake of South Africa’s, Burundi’s and The Gambia’s decision to withdraw from the International Criminal Court (ICC), the focus of observers and commentators has been on who is next. Who will...

Calls to Prosecute War Crimes in Syria are Growing. Is international justice possible?
17.10.16

This article, originally published for the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog, focuses on the (very) imperfect options for justice and accountability in Syria. Much of this has been covered at JiC...

Burundi’s Awkward — and Mostly Pointless — Farewell to the ICC
17.10.16

A government led by a President accused of mass human rights violations and crimes against humanity is seeking to end its relationship with the International Criminal Court (ICC). No, the President...

Peace and Justice in Colombia – A JiC Symposium
10.10.16

Earlier this month, Colombians voted in a referendum, one whose results captured the globe’s imagination. The reason for the intrigue was simple: after years of negotiations, the people of Colombia...

Referring Kenya to the ICC Assembly of States Parties, Part 3: Implications for the Ongoing Kenya Cases
06.10.16

This following is the third post in a three-part series in which Thomas Obel Hansen explores the recent referral of Kenya to the International Criminal Court’s Assembly of States Parties. The...

A Turn to the “Symbolic” at the International Criminal Court
05.10.16

A Turn to the “Symbolic” at the International Criminal Court | Justice in Conflict You don’t have to be a critic of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to accept that its first...

Referring Kenya to the ICC Assembly of States Parties, Part 2: Implications for Cooperation and Enforcement
04.10.16

This is the second post in a three-part series in which Thomas Obel Hansen explores the recent referral of Kenya to the International Criminal Court’s Assembly of States Parties. The referral...

Referring Kenya to the ICC Assembly of States Parties, Part 1: A Battle for the Narrative
03.10.16

Last month, Judges at the International Criminal Court (ICC) ruled that the government of Kenya had violated its obligations to cooperate with the ICC in the case against Kenyan President Uhuru...

Is the ICC Reconsidering its Policy on the “Interests of Justice”?
30.09.16

Two weeks ago, the Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) at the International Criminal Court (ICC) published the final version of its much-anticipated Policy Paper on Case Selection and Prioritisation...

That Time the Bush Administration (Probably) Kiboshed Iraq’s ICC Membership
27.09.16

In recent weeks, the internet has featured hundreds of articles exclaiming the need to investigate atrocities perpetrated in Iraq. Many continue to insist that UK officials who are responsible for...

Eichmann in Jerusalem—I
30.08.16

The New Yorker (first published in 1963)

Finding a Way Forward in South Sudan policy paper TJWG 10 August 2016
15.08.16

The Transitional Justice Working Group